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Reapply timing, blue light, & driving

Reapply Ginger Armor:
  • Every 1-2 hours while outside, driving or in direct sunlight
  • Every 4-6 hours if you are inside and only exposed to indirect sunlight.
  • Every 4-6 hours if you're in front of a screen because our sunscreen has Zinc which helps block HEV/blue light 
  • Immediately after swimming & toweling

Think of our mineral sunscreen like gas in a fuel tank:

  • You can add as much as you like and it will protect you for even longer, like carrying a separate gas tank in your car. If you’re going to be in very intense rays I recommend applying every hour, slightly over applying, and seeking out shade whenever possible (typically between the hours of 10am to 4pm, but the UV index will best tell you what the sun exposure is)
  • Also true, if you’re not using it, it will last longer. So if you’re indoors getting minimal UV ray exposure, applying minimally every 4-6 hours or just 1 time per day will protect you if you time it right and are indoors most of the day. 

Reapply on your left side face and arm while driving
  • Windows block as little as 50% of UVA rays which cause cancer & wrinkles but UVA rays don't cause visible burns--so you can get major skin damage without the noticeable burn if you do not protect this skin
  • Windows block UVB rays so a danger is that because you don't get the visual reminder of a visible burn (from UVB rays) you may think nothing is happening but your eyes aren't designed to see UVA ray damage
    • In the U.S. and countries where we drive on the left side of the car, the left side of your body is more likely to develop cancer....Can you guess why?
  • "In the U.S., melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers are more common on the left side, since drivers are most directly exposed through a window on their left side, and drivers are more common than passengers."
For more information check out this article:

https://www.skincancer.org/blog/driving-your-risk-for-skin-cancer/